6 Nations Championship

Europe's leading International rugby tournament

The 6 Nations Championship is a rugby competition played for by the International representative teams from the 6 leading European rugby playing countries. These are:

  • England
  • Wales
  • Ireland
  • Scotland
  • France
  • Italy

Each team plays the others once. The home ground advantage alternates from one year to the next. Unlike most rugby competitions, there are no bonus points so points are awarded as:

  • Win - 2 points
  • Draw - 1 point
  • Loss - 0 points

 In 2017, for the first time in the history of the Championship, a bonus points scoring system will be in use. 

  • A bonus point will be awarded to a team that scores 4 or more tries in a match.
  • A bonus point will be awarded to a team that loses a match by 7 or less points.
  • A team that wins all 5 matches (a Grand Slam) will be awarded an extra 3 bonus points.


Take a look at the last game in 2014 when Ireland won the Six Nations Championship, and the last game for a legend - Brian O'Driscoll


2017 Six Nations Championship Results

Click on the link above for the 6 Nations Championship results and competition tables

Previous Six Nations Championship Results

Click on this link to see all the results from previous years

6 Nations Championship History.

The 6 Nations championship is the current version of an international rugby competition that started in 1883. The inaugural tournament was called the Home Nations Championship and was played for by England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland.

In 1910 France was included and the competition became the 5 Nations Championship.

In 1932, due to allegations of professionalism and administrative deficiencies, France was refused entry and the competition reverted back to the Home Nations Championship, with 4 teams again.

In 1947, following the end of WWII, France was reinstated and it became the 5 Nations Championship again.

This remained unchanged until 2000 when Italy was admitted to the Competition and it became the 6 Nations Championship.

Up until 1994, teams shared the Championship if they were equal on points at the top of the table. From the 1994 season on, a winner was decided using the points difference between the win and loss totals of the equal teams.

There are also a couple of other 'mini' competitions within the Championship. If a team wins all it's matches it is said to have achieved a 'Grand Slam'. If a Home Nations team defeats all the other 3 teams then it is said to have won a 'Triple Crown'.

Championship Wins


Outright


Shared

England

Wales

France

Scotland

Ireland


28

26

17

14

13


10

12

8

8

9


Grand Slam Wins

England

Wales

France

Scotland

Ireland



12

11

9

3

2


Back to Back Grand Slam Wins

  • England - 1913 & 1914, 1923 & 1924, 1991 & 1992
  • Wales - 1908 & 1909
  • France - 1997 & 1998

Triple Crown Wins

England

Wales

Scotland

Ireland


25

20

10

10

4 Consecutive Triple Crown Wins

  • Wales - 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979
  • England - 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998

*Up to and including 2017 season